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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
experiences on the united states commission on civil rights, set up by president eisenhower in the 1950s senate. this is about half an hour. >> host: on your screen now as a well-known face for c-span viewers. that is mary frances berry, professor university of pennsylvania and also the author of several books, where the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about this book, justice for all. united states commission on civil rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to set up a civil rights commission, which wou
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it. >>host: initially it was set up as a temporary commission? >>guest: right. the right age one year before the overall crisis. it was too diffuse part of the crisis to present a better image of the country to the world. if on the way they could recommend solutions, that would be great. >>host: who
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 9:00pm PST
about fraud and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much
SFGTV2
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am PST
looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point of view of a parent. four years ago my son shot himself at scho
LINKTV
Dec 24, 2012 8:00am PST
any american president had made in modern times on the whole question of civil rights and voting rights. he condemned the violence over and over again, and near the end of the speech he said, "and we shall overcome. we shall overcome." we call it the "we shall overcome" speech. i was sitting next to dr. martin luther king jr. as we listened to president johnson. i looked at dr. king. tears came down his face. he started crying. and we all cried a little when we heard the president saying, "we shall overcome." and dr. king said, "we will make it from selma to montgomery, and the voting rights act will be passed." two weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conv
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 9:30pm PST
, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieu
LINKTV
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm PST
and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the freedom rides and spoke at the 1963 march on washington. he has been arrested more than 40 times and has just written a new book called across that vision for change. he visited us in our studio, and i asked congressmember lewis about the voter purge in florida, where the justice department had sued to block republican governor rick scott's controversial effort to remove thousands of registered voters from the rolls, using an outdated drivers' license database to ostensibly identify non-citizens registered to vote. rep. john lewis: it is unreal, it is unbelievable, that at this time in our history, 47 years after the voting rights act was passed and signed into
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00pm EST
issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the leadership ladder and he rises -- gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the with in a stealth campaign. -- whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. can replaces byrd mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could replace lyndon johnson. that is certain the way things work. as my book starts, the first chapter is about byrd. it is entitled "the grind." he is a hard-working
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 10:00am PST
english and chinese. we have a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i try to explain that in my books and to me, to see him do that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory, giving a true insight into how power works in washington and there's another reason that i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new and that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about 1,000 or 10,000
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 7:00am PST
any difference. the defense has been tried in court. is a civil rights statute. -- it is a civil rights statute. they can be a perfectly legitimate plaintiffs to bring a lawsuit, and there are a number of people who belong to disability organizations that actually, that is what their livelihood is, bringing these lawsuits. the gentleman over here, who was also a lawyer knows of at least one case involving two lawsuits. they started all neighborhoods. the target places like san francisco because this is an old city with old buildings, virtually none of which comply. we only have new construction that would be billed to 1988 compliance standards, usually. whatever kind of business you have, the building part does not enforce ada compliance. you have your architect look at the ada if you are going to make a major revision anyway. is very expensive to do that. the demand letter is a requirment for the state -- is a requirement for the state laws to be brought. for civil rights cases, you are expected to know the law and be in compliance. they do not make a demand under federal law sa
SFGTV2
Dec 22, 2012 3:30pm PST
about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so special, is that it's a legacy that transcends san francisco and it'
MSNBC
Dec 27, 2012 3:00pm PST
armed fortresses. >> why is the civil rights community up in arms about this? and is this just now that we're starting to see some of us in the civil rights community become concerned about assault weapons? >> well, absolutely not, reverended. national action network and other civil rights organizations have been engaged in this work to deem wial with the deregulatf gun laws. we have engaged in occupy the corners. we were out on corners all across the city. >> yeah, you would be on all night every weekend. >> absolutely. trying to stand in the kwa of violence on friday, saturday and sunday nights. we also are engaged in a task force against gun violence in new york city right now where we've allotted $5 million to go towards gun violence prevention. in atlanta, they had to shake off the violence campaign where they're working in schools. reverend charles williams has been working on this issue. we have been engaged for many years in dealing with this. >> let me ask you this. you come as the executive director for us with a personal commitment because in our communities of minoritie
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
way. here are the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. people often ask me why my fatherfather install the systems. as a lover of history, i know he would've been talk of this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. after the bay of pigs, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily acceptable until now. the original recordings of of varying quality, and it is not always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with our outstanding archivist, historian ed widmer did an extraordinary job. in election season, i find it fascinating to listen to my father talk about what kind of person succeeds in politics. he believed the time for changing, and he was right for the time. it is interesting to apply his standards to the current campaign. he talks about the od
SFGTV
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm PST
based on a weapon. also, in the south i remember reading during the civil rights period where they were hosing people down with water and the water also had a lethal impact. so i am just saying that these weapons sound, well we are not using a gun or actual bullets. but it does not actually necessarily, i am not convinced that it necessarily always takes away the lethal aspect. and i think that we have plenty of examples where people of color and low income working people have particularly been victimized by that and there was even that incident here at the theatre where that young man was brandishing another little, i don't know, he was not brandishing a gun was killed. so, i'm just afraid that if then, the option comes to you as a taser that that is where the people will go automatically. instead of having like you said, the slow down, think more. whatever. i'm not, you know, and since tasers do have a lethal, there is a possibility of that and i'm just not... i just wish that the conversation were really different here. >> i agree, i don't disagree with what you are saying and c
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 8:30am PST
of... well, it's the... historian david levering lewis puts it, "it was civil rights through art." black people had the idea-- which was a not very efficacious idea, but they had an idea-- that they could change the image of the race vis-à-vis white people who doubted our ancestor's intellectual integrity and intellectual capacities by creating great literature and art. so there was this big revolution of writing and it was called the harlem renaissance, but it led to renaissances throughout the caribbean and even in africa. you know, the négritude movement, which was started by a martinican, aimé césaire, and léopold senghor, who went on to become the first president of senegal, they were students at the sorbonne. they heard about the harlem renaissance and they created the négritude movement starting in 1934. and langstonughe probably the most googled and sited poet in the american cannon, translated works of these black american writers into spanish and french... >> hinojosa: that's so beautiful. >> ...because he was trilingual. so that there's been this interaction. it'
SFGTV2
Dec 28, 2012 3:30pm PST
civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to sleep during the coldest and rainiest nights of the yea
MSNBC
Dec 25, 2012 4:00am PST
of course he got us to the moon, created the peace corps, the first real civil rights president. as my son, michael, points out, he's a real history buff, he took the segregationist party and made it a civil rights party. and he inspired people to go into public life. he said, public life is where it's at. it's not sport, it's public life. that's the one redolent reality of our lives. he's still there as the symbol of, look at bill clinton. all of these guys are inspired to go into public life because of him. >> do you see in the second generation after president kennedy, others that still may rise up and become big national leaders? >> i don't see it yet. i think the new joe kennedy in congress will do very well. he may be there for life if he wants to be. patrick has had problems with addiction and dealt with it. he's happily married with a child. good for him to get into private life. i've always thought maria shriver could have done something in public life besides be first lady of california. i thought she had a lot of talent and incredible charisma. i'm not sure i see anybody
LINKTV
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm PST
2012. >> the north carolina governor is being urged to pardon a group of civil rights activists were falsely convicted and imprisoned 40 years ago for the firebombing of a white owned grocery store. the conviction was overturned in 1980, but the state has never pardon them. we will speak with one of the wilmington 10 who served eight years behind bars and it became head of the naacp. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama is set to meet with congressional leaders at the white house just three days before a year in deadline to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. some $600 billion in automatic spending cuts and tax increases will take effect if no agreement is reached. obama and the rest of republicans remain of the impasse over the republican refusal to allow tax hikes even for the wealthiest americans. senate majority leader on thursday accused house speaker john boehner of holding up a deal. >> the american people i don't think understand the house representative is operating without the ho
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
thurmond's career, the vikings 1957 civil rights bill. why the south must prevail a. four days before thurmond historic filibuster. i'm quoting now from that editorial. 57, the "national review." essential question that emerges is whether the white community in the south isn't up to take such measures as are necessary to prevail politically and culturally in areas in which it does not predominate in america. the sobering answer is yes. the white community is so entitled because for the time being it is the advanced race. buckley, jr. and thurmond would seem to occupy separate polls in conservative politics. their actions alone marked a alone marked their different backgrounds and experiences. it is easy to forget that buckley was once a fledgling writer and publisher trying to stimulate himself and the world of politics and letters. the son of a oil baron, and thurmond was a priceless compact, father and son both. later, after a seachange inaugurated on the civil rights movement, thurmond would not be the only conservative leader with a segregationist record in need of scrubbing. in t
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
civil rights act of '64, the voting rights act of '65. fair housing act of '86. republicans and democrats in the spirit that you are calling for, and i have one other thought since we're talking about our sponsoring institutions for this extraordinary conversation, that's the national archive -- i think that the framers of the constitution who were amending their regime, studied what had gone they studied the state constitution. saw which ones worked and didn't. massachusetts put the constitution to a vote let's put our constitution to a vote. most of the constitutions have three banch branches of government. let's go with that. most have vie -- an independent executive works well for massachusetts and new york. let's build on that. many of the bill of rights. george mason he gives u.s. virginia bill of rights. that's model for the federal bill of rights. abolition of slavery occurred in several states. and we have to study, you know, and make amendments. what has gone before us. we have the duty to the future, i think we danger it best when we actually are understanding or resp
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments and developments. who is this a
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving
SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 2:30pm PST
as well and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come
WETA
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
democratic process as an engine for change, at the moment of the civil rights -- african american civil rights movement culminating in the voting rights act, civil rights act, the beginning of the great society. and then the left said, "you know what? democracy doesn't work. let's take to the streets." well, always take to the streets, but always make sure that there are people in the halls of power who can listen to what you're saying on the streets and say, "okay, i get it. i'm going to do something about this." which means surrendering to some degree the romance of revolution. i hope that i'm not less radical in terms of what i'd like to see transformed. i believe that we can live in a more economically and socially just world than we live in. i think we have to save the planet and i think that's going to call for enormous sacrifice and a transformation of society where we really come to terms with what has to happen in order to stop global warming or reverse it. >> and can that happen without a mass movement? what lincoln did he did because before him and behind him were the aboliti
CNN
Dec 23, 2012 8:00am PST
civilized society. by bringing in an even more toxic mix of reckless behavior and criminal cruelty right into our homes. >> so, is there any validity to these bombastic charges against the press. joining us now here in washington, terence smith, former correspondent for pbs news hour and cbs news and "new york times." and tom foreman who attended friday's nra event. tom, what was it like being at this nra event? i won't call it a press conference. are you surprised that not a single journalist got to ask a question? >> it was not a press conference. all of us expected to exchange questions and answers with wayne lapierre and the president of nra who was there. it didn't happen at all. it did not happen but adamantly did not happen. several of us tried to call out questions to the participants and even at one point i said to them, would you answer even one question? are you willing to talk to the white house about any of this, even to that, they just kept walking. that was a big disappointment and sort of set the tone for the room. >> when wayne lapierre said falsehoods about semiautomati
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:20pm EST
civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear, would you mind giving a lecture at washington university? you m
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:15am EST
around from point to point as we were advised by john door, my iconic civil rights hero and nicholas katzenbach. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time, there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we had cop instant, we were constantly aware who might come up on to the campus, didn't look like a student, had a bent mind and a deer rifle, and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. he was a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple days reading the hate mail, the death threats. very accurate, very detailed. james, we know where you live, we know where your participants are -- parents are, we're going to kill you and we're going to kill your twins. he looked at me and said, lieu tempt, i'm late for my spanish class. let's go. that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never cracked, he never blinked. the students blinked. i should say that 99% of the student body went about their way getting an education. they cared little about him being on the campu
MSNBC
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm PST
those red states need to understand what is at stake and who stood where. it's an old civil rights song. what side are you on. if it comes to that, that's exactly what the american people need to say, not to democrats, not to republicans, but to american people. that's who's going to be impacted by this. when you don't give your un employment check, when your payroll tax goes up, when your paycheck is not what it was, that's going to be to the american people. we will then have the bipartisanship because everybody is going to suffer together. >> you better believe it. >> and the republicans keep saying they're worried for the 2014 vote. well, let's get a vote and think of what's going to happen in 2014. >> dr. james peterson and maria theresa, thanks for your time tonight. both of you have a happy new year: >> thanks, reverend. happy new year to you, too. >> whoever said the republicans haven't accomplished anything, they are finishing something in first place today. >> "politics nation" has voted and we have the top political picture of the year. it's a good one. that's next. [ laughte
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm PST
elinated the psych ward. >> we had someone attached himself to the civil-rights for those confined in mental institutions. so our rights were being abridged and suld be released. in many places there were no accommodations made. >> that part was fulfilled. it was talked about but never fulfilled. i am going to go back to the point that nobody likes, this nexus between mental health and guns is something i'm not ready to make unless we go all the way and suggest that some of these individuals we have incarcerated in jail who killed one or two people, that they are mentally ill as well. they do not count. it is only the kid -- >> we have irrational killers. al capone. they were courting in on his territory so he was shot. that is not mental illness. but if you think like a german loughner, where you live in a world of numerology and forces -- he was talking about the influence of grammar that the government was using over him. you are talking about people living in a different world and they are not responsible. i believe in the insanity defense and acquittal on the grounds of insanity.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)